Burg Frankenstein

Burg Frankenstein

From Wikipedia:

“In 1673, Johann Conrad Dippel was born in the castle, where he was later engaged as a professional alchemist. It is suggested that Dippel influenced Mary Shelley‘s fantasy when she wrote her Frankenstein novel, though there is no mention of the castle in Shelley’s journals from the time. However, it is known that in 1814, prior to writing the famous novel, Shelley took a journey on the river Rhine. She spent a few hours in the town of Gernsheim, which is located about ten miles away from the castle. Several nonfiction books on the life of Mary Shelley claim Dippel as a possible influence.

Dippel created an animal oil known as Dippel’s Oil which was supposed to be equivalent to the “elixir of life”. Dippel attempted to purchase Castle Frankenstein in exchange for his elixir formula, which he claimed he had recently discovered; the offer was turned down.[6] There are also rumours[who?] that during his stay at Frankenstein Castle, Dippel practiced not only alchemy but also anatomy and may have performed experiments on dead bodies that he exhumed. There are rumours[who?] that he dug up bodies and performed medical experiments on them at the castle and that a local cleric would have warned his parish that Dippel had created a monster that was brought to life by a bolt of lightning. (The use of lightning to bring Frankenstein’s monster to life comes from the 1931 film and isn’t in the novel.) There are local people who still claim today that this actually happened and that this tale was related to Shelley’s stepmother by the Brothers Grimm, the German ethnologists. However, none of these claims have been proven to this date, and some local researchers doubt any connection between Mary Shelley and Frankenstein Castle.”

 

Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD
Burg Frankenstein, Don Michael Hudson PhD

Kloster Lorsch

From Wikipedia:

“The abbey was founded in 764 by the Frankish Count Cancor and his widowed mother Williswinda as a proprietary church (Eigenkirche) and monastery on their estate, Laurissa. It was dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul. The founders entrusted its government to Cancor’s nephew ChrodegangArchbishop of Metz, who became its first abbot. The pious founders enriched the new abbey by further donations. To make the abbey popular as a shrine and a place of pilgrimage, Chrodegang obtained from Pope Paul I the body of Saint Nazarius, martyred at Rome with three companions under Diocletian

On 11 July 765, the sacred relics arrived and with great solemnity were deposited in the basilica of the monastery. In 766 Chrodegang resigned the office of abbot, in favour of his other duties as Archbishop of Metz. He then sent his brother Gundeland to Lorsch as his successor, with fourteen Benedictine monks.

That same year, there was a dispute about property rights between Gundeland and Cancor’s son, and the abbey was moved to an Ice Age dune, a few hundred metres from its original location on a small island in the Weschnitz. In 772, Gundeland applied to the highest authority, Charlemagne, who found in his favour. Gundeland gave the abbey with all his properties to the king, turning it into a Royal abbey.

The abbey and basilica were then renamed in honour of Saint Nazarius: the main church of Saints Peter, Paul, and Nazarius was consecrated by the Archbishop of Mainz in September 774, in the presence of Charlemagne.”

 

Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Kloster Lorsch in the Round

Kloster Lorsch
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Kloster Lorsch
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

From Wikipedia:

“The abbey was founded in 764 by the Frankish Count Cancor and his widowed mother Williswinda as a proprietary church (Eigenkirche) and monastery on their estate, Laurissa. It was dedicated to Saint Peter and Saint Paul. The founders entrusted its government to Cancor’s nephew ChrodegangArchbishop of Metz, who became its first abbot. The pious founders enriched the new abbey by further donations. To make the abbey popular as a shrine and a place of pilgrimage, Chrodegang obtained from Pope Paul I the body of Saint Nazarius, martyred at Rome with three companions under Diocletian

On 11 July 765, the sacred relics arrived and with great solemnity were deposited in the basilica of the monastery. In 766 Chrodegang resigned the office of abbot, in favour of his other duties as Archbishop of Metz. He then sent his brother Gundeland to Lorsch as his successor, with fourteen Benedictine monks.

That same year, there was a dispute about property rights between Gundeland and Cancor’s son, and the abbey was moved to an Ice Age dune, a few hundred metres from its original location on a small island in the Weschnitz. In 772, Gundeland applied to the highest authority, Charlemagne, who found in his favour. Gundeland gave the abbey with all his properties to the king, turning it into a Royal abbey.

The abbey and basilica were then renamed in honour of Saint Nazarius: the main church of Saints Peter, Paul, and Nazarius was consecrated by the Archbishop of Mainz in September 774, in the presence of Charlemagne.”