Blog

Kotor, Montenegro (Jun 21)

Kotor, Montenegro (Jun 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Kotor, Montenegro (Jun 21)

 
Q2 Mono
 
I’ve been meditating on Bob Dylan’s “Murder Most Foul.”
How does one put words to unspeakable things? I don’t know; wish I did.
 
“Take me back to Tulsa to the scene of the crime
Play another one and, “Another One Bites the Dust”
Play, “The Old Rugged Cross” and, “In God We Trust”
Ride the pink horse down that long, lonesome road.”
 
As far as I know, this is one of the few icons rendering Joseph, the father of Jesus at Station XIV.

Aspen Thompson: The Archaeological Process in the Southern Levant

Aspen Thompson: Archaeology of the So Levant Final Paper
King University

Aspen Thompson

May 29, 2021

Archeology Final Paper

Picture by CROW CANYON ARCHEOLOGICAL CENTER

PART 1: THE ARCHEOLOGICAL PROCESS

The Archeological Process has many steps that best describe how an archeologist and other experts do their work while on site. While studying the different steps, it is interesting to see how detailed oriented they must be to excavate grounds and find little pieces of historical evidence. The steps of the archeological process include finding a site, surveying, and examining the ground, define activity zones and a certain area excavated, documentation, and completed in an organized report.

When it comes to the location of an archeological site, there are many details to consider such as the safety of the site, close to an access to drinking water, fertility of land, near some roads, and other resources. The site that is chosen may be seen from the surface or could be below the ground. As soon as the archaeological site is decided then construction to the grounds would begin. At most sites though, a “pedestrian surface survey” is conducted before getting started as this helps them document all the items they find above the surface. By doing this survey beforehand, it gives a better idea of what items may be found during the excavation.

The context of the site such as the duration, function, and the environment must also be examined. The site then goes through two different processes which are the ‘depositional’ process and the ‘post depositional’ process. The depositional process shows what has happened to the site throughout history when it was being used. The post depositional process is the time where the site was no longer in use by humans, and this also includes natural circumstances.

During the excavations it helps to put together activity zones which will then help the archeologist understand what happened in that exact spot they may find remains. One way they are able to understand what activity took place is by excavating in small trenches which helps them see more of the layers of the settlement. Excavations are often put together by squares on a grid to help show the area they are specifically working on.

As the excavation is taking place, everything that is found is documented. These documents no only share about the finds but also include pictures, sometimes drawings, as well as the elevation that day. By the end of the excavation a report will be put together of detailed information of all the finds, everything about the site, and anything else. After the report is complete it is then published and all the finds are turned into the “Israel Antiquities Authority.”

The Archeological Process is then complete until the next one of course.

Picture by BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY

PART 2: MAIN ISSUES FROM THE CHALCOLITHIC PERIOD IN ISRAEL

We learned about numerous periods in Israel while studying Archeology such as the Chalcolithic Period, Early Bronze, Intermediate Bronze Ages, Middle Bronze, and Late Bronze. All these periods have great detailed information of what was discovered in the location of their sites but also shares some issues they ran into as well. The Chalcolithic Period is the one that sticks out the most as it talks about the beauty of the art objects found.

The Ghassulian culture was the main culture in the Chalcolithic Period and the main site that was studied was called Teleilat Ghassul. Unlike the Early Bronze Age where many public buildings were found, the architecture found in this period were mainly houses called “broad houses” as well as some burrows in the Beersheba region. Beautiful pottery and jars used for storage was mainly found in these locations and is grouped together as the “Ghassulain material culture.”

Now the Chalcolithic Period, like the other periods in Israel did have the potential of having objects and settlement destroyed by natural disasters or migration of people throughout the years. If this happened, then the layers of the settlement may not have the newer items on top and the older ones on the bottom. This could cause the evidence of what they have found to be a little inaccurate. On example of this is when the settlement in the Early Bronze Age seemed to match more of the Chalcolithic Period.

As each period varies in what they find and shows even more evidence of how civilization once use to live, it is interesting to think that they can get an idea of what it looked like just from pieces dug up from the ground. Though mentioned before that there can be disasters or events that mess up the settlement and may not give an accurate reading of what an archeologist may find, it’s still a start and the best evidence we have in knowing history.

Picture by PEDIAA

PART 3: SOURCES AVAILABLE TO RECONSTRUCTING HISTORY

Archeological finds and the Hebrew Bible are two great sources in helping reconstruct history. Pottery, stone tools, and other artifacts that have been found in Israel also help us understand and reconstruct history. Pottery was the item most found in Israel and depending on the context of the item, it can help determine what period it might have come from using “functional typology.” Flint tools and mortars can help give an indication of what technology or architecture found in that period. If any art objects are found, this can give us an understanding of what they believed or felt then when it was being created. When bronze or iron is found it correlates to weapons or even coins which helps date the item. All these objects can help date an item but C14 is the most common way used when they find things that was once living. It is like science, history, and even technology work together in a way to find the date of an object.

 

REFERENCES

Picture #1

https://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/ancient-cultures/daily-life-and-practice/journey-to-the-copper-age-a-video-lecture-by-thomas-evan-levy/

Picture #2

https://www.crowcanyon.org/index.php/stratigraphicdating

Picture #3

https://pediaa.com/difference-between-absolute-and-relative-dating/

Also used power points, videos, and documents that we learned from in this class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Devona Brazier: “Interpreting Tel Aphek”

Devona Brazier: Archaeology of the So Levant

 

Devona’s final paper/project consists of two parts worth 20 points each and a third part worth 5 points: the first part will examine the student’s criticism capabilities of the archaeological process. The second will examine the student’s knowledge and understanding of the main issues concerning a specific time period in the archaeology of Palestine/Israel. The third will deal with the sources available for reconstructing history.

Devona Brazier
May 29, 2021

Interpreting Tel Aphek

It is with unsurprising regularity that a guest on PBS’s Antiques Roadshow is disappointed to discover that the early American artifact they have had in their family for ages is not three hundred years old and precious, but actually, a fifty-year-old replica and the reason it passed so plausibly is that it is poorly cared for, not because it is valuable. Our hopes for the authenticity of an object often prevent us from seeing the clues pointing towards any other origin story than the one upon which one has set their heart. This is true for hundred-year-old antiques and even more true for three-thousand-year-old remains in the Holy Land, the location of hundreds of archaeological digs. Each team working on the site arrives with their own expectations for what is embedded within each stratum of dirt based on political, cultural, ethnic, and religious biases. The hope is that through professional and measurable archaeological techniques, what is found beneath our feet can be cataloged and recorded in such a way that a realistic and accurate picture of life in the Levant region of the Bronze and Iron Ages, what was once Canaan, can be understood. Some of the evidence seems to validate the stories from Joshua, Judges, and Kings, but some do not. Despite the challenges, archaeologists continue to dig in the hopes of making clear the dusty past.

How does an historical city become buried in the earth, and how does an archaeological team uncover it? It is helpful to review the findings at Tel Aphek, a site called Area X situated just a short drive Northwest of modern-day Jerusalem. As one would see today, there is a sizable Ottoman-era fortress upon an earthworks mound. This site is already old, with the surface structures long abandoned by Ottoman Turks who built the fortress, but underneath the surface is a peeling-back of history to the Middle Bronze Age in the third millennium BCE. Anyone who has seen modern construction knows that to build a stable structure, first, one must build a level foundation. One way to establish that foundation is to excavate a flat ground, but when the safest location for a city is atop a hill, it is better to fill in the space on a hill and build on top of that fill. The earthen fill creates a packed layer of soil to build upon, but it also buries and hides whatever is under it, and only by digging down can one uncover what is there. Teams have found under the Ottoman fortress at Tel Aphek both Israelite and Philistine settlements from the Iron Age and Canaanite settlements from the Late Bronze and Middle Bronze Age (Finkelstein 599).

To uncover these sites, a team uses strategic digging techniques intended to disturb as little of the site as possible to prevent displacing objects when unprepared to catalog them appropriately. Using surface reconnaissance in areas suspected to hold evidence of human activity, archaeological teams decide where to dig based on the discovery of sherds, coins, or other metal artifacts, or depressions in the soils which appear to match man-made structures. Other times, modern demolition will uncover material culture that is obviously from an historic site, and a quick archaeological salvage effort will take place before the area is destroyed. In the early twentieth century and before, teams would dig a square locus of soil, ten centimeters at a time, and record their findings as they were discovered. But in the early modern era, a British team lead by Mortimer Wheeler and expanded by Kathleen Kenyan began a more intentional digging practice which came to be known as the Wheeler-Kenyan Method of excavation. In this new method, a locus would be dug carefully while taking note of changes in the soil structure and keeping any material culture found in a soil stratum and separated into baskets labeled with benchmarks from the stratigraphy. Using this method allowed teams to keep track of which material culture went with which strata and make it possible to compare the bulks in different loci to use the soil benchmarks to keep track of strata across a site.

If one were digging in Tel Aphek, the stratigraphy would look something like this: The surface soil is Ottoman Era backfill of soil, hard-packed into the floor of a fort. Next, the Ottomans filled a layer of earth, with material culture from the surrounding area randomly embedded within it as the soil was disturbed by the filling. Also within is the Iron Age walls and material culture in situ as it was buried by the Ottomans when filling. Below this is the dirt filled in by the Philistines or Israelites who built here when establishing the citadel on the previous remains of the Canaanite, or possibly Egyptian city built in the Late bronze era. By cataloging finds as they were discovered, layer by layer, different findings can be attributed to the Age to which it belongs.

But what has this to do with the risk of misattributing a find because of one’s presuppositions? Compare two different Iron Age discoveries- Jericho, which was carefully cataloged by Kenyon of the Wheeler-Kenyon method of stratigraphy whose goal was to determine if Canaanites were living in the city-state during the time of Joshua and his conquest recorded in the Bible, and Hazor, which was studied by Yigal Yadin, a Hebrew nationalist who worked in 1950 with the support of the newly formed Israeli government to establish an historical argument for the presence of Israel on what had previously been Palestinian land (Cline 42-45). Kenyon was asked to revisit the location of the ruins of Jericho, bringing her advanced excavation techniques to clarify whether there was any evidence of Jericho falling to Joshua’s army as recorded in the Bible. By a thoroughly cataloged review of pottery found in the site, Kenyon concluded that the city had fallen at least a thousand years previous to the time of Joshua’s military campaign. Indeed, the lack of any pottery from the Late Bronze Age led her to conclude that the city was completely uninhabited since 1550 BCE (Cline 41). Her lack of commitment to the Biblical narrative led to her conclusions.

In contrast, Yadin enjoyed Israel’s new prime minister’s blessing following the Six-Year War to work hard to uncover what could be discovered at Hazor, a Middle and Late Bronze Age Canaanite city that, much like Tel Aphek was an earthen mound with a fortification atop. Unlike the uninhabited Jericho, Hazor did have supporting evidence of destruction from the Joshua era as the strata dating to the thirteenth century BCE had evidence of ash and man-made destruction as well as a casement wall (Cline 44-45). These dates aligned with Joshua’s Biblical narrative with more certainty, as his campaign was recorded as traveling through Megiddo, Gezer, and Hazor. Yadin also worked on excavations at Megiddo, where he discovered an arch in a lower stratum, which he attributed to a palace of King Solomon. His intention to use archaeological discoveries to lend more credibility to Biblical accounts and thus validate the current Jewish position in Israel led him to seek similar arches in Gezer, Megiddo, and Jerusalem. These places were all mentioned in the biblical narrative as having been inhabited during Solomon’s reign and thus would be obvious locations to dig. Yadin did indeed find these arches in place underneath the foundation of Assyrian fortifications. In fact, there is evidence that the foundations discovered in Megiddo were even from the Age of King David (Mazar 382).

Which conclusions are correct? Just because someone comes to the site with preconceptions for what will be found there, it’s not necessarily a coincidence that the predicted discoveries were found. There are more ways than just digging until the team discovers a foundation of a building to corroborate a find in any excavation site. Sometimes a stratum will have unexpected material culture embedded within it; for example, Egyptian Scarabs are all over the Levant from different ages. The names of the Pharaohs written on the scarabs can help to date locations. Cult objects found in a location, like burial sarcophagus or idols set in places of worship, can be used to place a people group. Radiocarbon dating can verify the date of a site when organic material is present. Written records from outside the region but set in the same era can also prove a location, such as references to the House of David written on cuneiform tablets or Egyptian etchings of the King of Israel losing the battle to the Pharaoh.

Every once in a while, the object on Antiques Roadshow is an authentic artifact matching the family lore that followed from generation to generation as they passed the item along. But whenever that authentic item is appraised, the professional uses multiple clues for verification. That chipped paint, the crackle in the oil paint, the stamp in the base of the ceramic jar, these clues all point to the history of the piece in question. Likewise, when a site is uncovered in the Levant, no matter how tempting it is to attribute that location or artifact to the people group you hoped were responsible for its presence in the excavated unit, multiple methods of verification are required to make the case. Just because Yadin had a political purpose in finding evidence of Israelite sites, it does not discredit the actual discovery of Iron Age structures that match the biblical narrative of the Solomon era. Even at its most significant numbers, the Tribes of

Israel were always a minority in the region. Even at locations where most people agree the Israelites were the inhabitants, the cultic practices often mirrored their neighboring people groups blurring the lines between the people of YHWH and Canaanites, Assyrians, Philistines, or Egyptians. With so many competing goals for the research in the Levant and so many years of history layered one on top of the other, it is impressive we can say we know anything discovered for sure.

WORKS CITED
Cline, Eric H. Biblical Archaeology: a Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press, 2009.

Gadot, Yuval, and Esther Yadin. “Aphek-Antipatris II- The Remains on the Acropolis.” Emery and Claire Yass, Publications in Archaeology, 2009.

Mazar, Amihai. Archaeology of the Land of the Bible: 10000-586 B.C.E. Yale University Press, 2009.

Bullets Ricochet Around the World: Croatia, Lebanon, Syria

Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Hims, Syria
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Beirut, Lebanon
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD
Wars Around the World
Otocac, Croatia
Don Michael Hudson. PhD

Gacka, Croatia (May 21)

Gacka, Croatia (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Gacka, Croatia (May 21)

Q2 Mono

Sometimes you’re driving down a little country road in a place far, far away and bam…

“You are a king. Live alone. Take a free road
And follow where your free mind leads you,
Bring to perfection the fruits of well-loved thoughts
Ask no reward for noble deeds accomplished.
Rewards are within you. Your supreme judge is yourself.
None will ever judge your work more sternly.
Discriminating artist, does it please you?”

Pushkin

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake, Bled, Slovenia

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake, Bled, Slovenia (May 21)

5D M3
“It’s so easy to drown in the dream.
Oh, and everything is not what it seems
This life is but a dream,
Shattered illusions that hold your spirit down.
Open up your heart and you’ll find love all around.
Breathing and moving are healing
And soothing away
All the pain in life holding you down.”
Sturgill Simpson, “Breakers Roar”

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake, Bled, Slovenia

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake, Bled, Slovenia (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Church of the Mother of God on the Lake, Bled, Slovenia (May 21)

5D M3
Statue of Mary Magdalene
“Then Jesus turned toward the woman while he was speaking to Simon, ‘Don’t you see this woman? When I came into your house, you did not even give me water for my feet, but she has washed my feet with her tears and dried them with her hair. You did not kiss me when I entered your home, but she has been kissing my feet since I came in. You did not anoint my head, but she poured perfume on my feet. Listen to me, Simon; her innumerable sins are forgiven, so she pours out great love. But the person who is forgiven just a little will love only a little.’”
Gospel of Luke 7: 44-47 (translation mine)
The Scriptures do not name this woman so we don’t know if she is Magdalene or not. “Tradition” named this woman as St. Mary from Magdala.

Jože Plečnik’s house/museum

Jože Plečnik’s house/museum
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Second time back to see Jože Plečnik’s house/museum. Died 1957 at the age of 84. It is strange to say that an architect has heavily influenced my thinking, but there it is, he has and does. He was an artist-poet-architect as Heidegger was a philosopher-poet. I am grateful to both men. A woman-friend asked Plečnik to marry her written in a letter. He replied, “I am already married to my architecture.”

Stara Fuzina, Slovenia (May 21)

Stara Fuzina, Slovenia (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Stara Fuzina, Slovenia (May 21)

 
5D M3
 
“As a Scot and a Presbyterian, my father believed that man by nature was a mess and had fallen from an original state of grace. Somehow, I early developed the notion that he had done this by falling from a tree. As for my father, I never knew whether he believed God was a mathematician but he certainly believed God could count and that only by picking up God’s rhythms were we able to regain power and beauty. Unlike many Presbyterians, he often used the word ‘beautiful.'”
 
Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It

Stiftskirche, Stuttgart, DE (May 21)

Stiftskirche Church, Stuttgart, DE (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Stiftskirche, Stuttgart, DE (May 21)
5D M3
“Perhaps the mission of those who love mankind is to make people laugh at the truth, to make truth laugh, because the only truth lies in learning to free ourselves from insane passion for the truth.”
Umberto Eco

Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21) Q2 Mono

Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
Don Michael Hudson, Phd
Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
Don Michael Hudson, Phd
Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)

Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s” Cemetery, Messkirch, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
Don MIchael Hudson PhD
Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s Cemetery,” Messkirch, DE (May 21) Q2 Mono
Messkirch Cemetery, “Heidegger’s Cemetery,” Messkirch, DE (May 21) Q2 Mono

St. John’s Church, Feuchtwangen, DE (May 21)

St. John’s Church, Feuchtwangen, DE (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

St. John’s, Feuchtwangen, DE (May 21)
 
5D M3
 
“Coherence, I don’t want it anymore. Coherence is mutilation. I want disorder. I can only guess at it through a vehement incoherence. To mediate, I took myself out of me first and I feel the void. It is in the void that one passes the time. She who adored a nice day at the beach, with sun, sand and sun. Man is abandoned, has lost contact with the earth, with the sky. He no longer lives, he exists.”
Clarice Lispector, “The Departure of the Train”

Church of the Coronation of Mary, Stuppach, DE (May 21)

Church of the Coronation of Mary, Stuppach, DE (May 21)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

Church of the Coronation of Mary, Stuppach, DE (May 21)
Q2 Mono
“The Descent,” William Carlos Williams
The descent
made up of despair
and without accomplishment
realizes a new awakening:
which is a reversal
of despair.
For what we cannot accomplish, what
is denied to love,
what we have lost in the anticipation-
a descent follows,
endless and indestructible.

The Israel Narrative Is Crumbling Because Of Phone Cameras And The Internet

The Israel Narrative Is Crumbling Because Of Phone Cameras And The Internet

Written by Caitlin Johnstone

https://caitlinjohnstone.com/2021/05/11/the-israel-narrative-is-crumbling-because-of-phone-cameras-and-the-internet/?fbclid=IwAR3hpQYuEacSs1Q5hbpONy5tZgvC2kZPGRz7Hcd0XOGnBXm8Wi_EEildqR4

“Twenty-four people, including nine children, were killed in Gaza overnight, most of them in Israeli strikes,” reads a new report from AP.

Nine children, killed with the help of United States funding to the tune of $3.8 billion a year.

Remember kids, the US loves Muslims and just wants to protect their human rights.

The Monday night airstrikes were in response to rocket attacks by Gaza resistance groups which had reportedly injured six Israelis, and those rocket attacks were in turn were a response to a deluge of Israeli police brutality footage in Jerusalem in preceding days. Electronic Intifada reports:

This came at the end of a day of violence that began in occupied East Jerusalem, where Israeli forces assaulted worshippers at the al-Aqsa mosque compound, injuring hundreds.

 

Scenes of brutality in Jerusalem generated outrage and solidarity among Palestinians and around the world.

 

The military wing of the Palestinian resistance organization Hamas issued an ultimatum giving Israel an hour – until 6 pm local time – to withdraw its forces from al-Aqsa and the occupied East Jerusalem neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah, and free detainees.

 

When the deadline passed, resistance groups in Gaza fired volleys of rockets towards Jerusalem for the first time since the summer 2014 war, prompting celebrations from some Palestinians.

Jennine | Save Sheikh Jarrah From Evictions

@jennineak

This is a Twitter bot that tracks changes and edits to stories in the New York Times. Take a look at this and tell me there isn’t systemic anti-Palestinian bias in media.

Before: The police entered the compound and fired rubber-tipped bullets. Anger was already building in response to the looming expulsion of several Palestinian families from their homes in the city.
After: Gaza militants fired rockets toward Jerusalem and the Israeli police fought with Palestinian protesters in an escalation of violence after a week of increasing tensions.

 

The mass media are working furiously to spin this in a way that rivals my satire piece from the other day. The New York Times has been cartoonishly re-writing its own reporting in a desperate attempt to make Israel look like an innocent victim of unprovoked attacks instead of the obvious aggressor against people protesting a brutal apartheid regime backed by an entire empire. The New York Post falsely reported that the deaths on Monday were caused by “Airstrikes from Hamas militants” (when did Hamas get an air force?) when sharing an article which falsely implied that those fatalities were inflicted by both sides. DW News framed its headline in a way that suggested the nine children killed had been involved in “fighting” against Israeli forces, and the word “clashes” is being thrown about willy nilly to describe a very one-sided assault.

But it isn’t working.

Social media is teeming with viral video footage of police assaulting peaceful worshippers in the Al-Aqsa Mosque compound, of Israelis cheering and chanting “Yimach shemam (may their names be erased)” at the sight of a fire near the mosque, of Israeli soldiers arresting Palestinian protesters using the signature knee-on-neck maneuver made famous by the murder of George Floyd, many of which have millions of views. Mainstream politicians on both sides of the Atlantic are putting out statements explicitly condemning Israel as the aggressor in these attacks, and the White House is facing some actual adversarial journalism for once regarding its refusal to denounce the killing of Palestinian children and its absurd position that Palestinians have no right to defend themselves.

Embedded video

 

This is the most mainstream that criticism of Israeli apartheid oppression has ever been in my lifetime, and as more and more mainstream human rights groups begin acknowledging the reality of that oppression it’s only getting more so.

Whenever I say something critical of Israel I always get readers saying “Oh man, you’re going to get attacked so bad for this, dissent on Israel is not tolerated,” but quite honestly that hasn’t been my experience at all and I think it’s an outdated perception. In the few years I’ve been at this commentary gig I’ve found I get far more aggressive pushback when I criticize establishment narratives regarding Russia or China, or even Syria and Venezuela, than I do when I criticize Israel. The pushback is there of course, but it’s not nearly as virulent as what I’m used to.

There are a lot of factors contributing to the growing awareness of Israel’s brutality, but I think the main reason is very simple: there are only so many viral videos of unconscionable acts that can be dismissed with “Actually this is way more complicated than it looks.” It is not more complicated than it looks. Clearly. It looks bad because it is bad.

At a recent video appearance for the International Festival of Whistleblowing, Dissent and Accountability, Israel-based journalist Jonathan Cook described the changes he’s seen as smartphones and internet access made Palestinians less dependent on the work of sympathetic activists and gave them the ability to directly share footage of their own abuse. Cook says the following:

Sadly most corporate journalists paid little attention to the work of these activists. In any case, their role was quickly snuffed out. That was partly because Israel learnt that shooting a few of them served as a very effective deterrent, warning others to keep away.

 

But it was also because as technology became cheaper and more accessible – eventually ending up in mobile phones that everyone was expected to have – Palestinians could record their own suffering more immediately and without mediation.

 

Israel’s dismissal of the early, grainy images of the abuse of Palestinians by soldiers and settlers – as “Pallywood” (Palestinian Hollywood) – became ever less plausible, even to its own supporters. Soon Palestinians were recording their mistreatment in high definition and posting it directly to YouTube.

Seeing is believing, and a video is difficult to narrative manage. The dominant narrative is no longer solely in the hands of propaganda outlets like The New York Times which can spin everything that happens with a pro-Israel slant, it’s being spread all over the internet in a medium that is far more objective than print.

This is so effective because, unlike so many other ugly aspects of the US-centralized power alliance, Israeli apartheid is not some covert government operation being run by highly trained agents and manipulators. Those responsible for carrying out its day-to-day abuses are just ordinary civilians, police and soldiers who have not been trained on the sinister craft of perception management. Who aren’t acutely aware that it’s bad optics to tell a Palestinian family on camera that if you don’t steal their house then someone else will. Who don’t have bad PR at the forefront of their attention when they’re cheering as they shoot Palestinian protesters. Who just react to the racist nationalist propaganda they’ve been ingesting all their lives instead of considering how difficult it will be to narrative manage a video of them cheering and chanting “may their names be erased” at the sight of flames.

Awareness is spreading of Israeli apartheid brutality for the same reason awareness is spreading of US police brutality: the internet combined with smartphone cameras. Seeing is believing. Seeing brings change.

This is why the powerful are working so hard to censor the internet. If they can’t control what our dominant narratives are going to be, they will not be able to rule us.

Will they succeed? Jonathan Cook’s aforementioned speech concludes with some words of hope and encouragement:

The establishment are being forced into a game of whack-a-mole with us. Each time they bully or dismantle a platform we use, another one – like Substack – springs up to replace it. That is because there will always be journalists determined to find a way to peek behind the curtain to tell us what they found there. And there will always be audiences who want to learn what is behind the curtain. Supply and demand are on our side.

 

The constant acts of intimidation and violence by political and media elites to crush media pluralism in the name of “democratic values” will serve only to further expose the hypocrisy and bad faith of the corporate media and its hired hands.

 

We must keep struggling because the struggle itself is a form of victory.

 

St. John’s Church, Feuchtwangen, DE (May 21)

St. John’s Church, Feuchtwangen, DE

 

St. John’s Church, Feuchtwangen, DE (May 21)
 
5D M3
 
“The strange paths. She sealed her fate with a single sin to which she surrendered entirely, and behold her on the threshold of being saved. Every humble path is a path: crude sin is a path, ignorance of the commandments is a path, lust is a path. The only thing not a path was my premature joy at taking, as a guide and so easily, the sacred path. The only thing not a path was my presumption of being saved halfway through. Lord, grant me the grace to sin.”
Clarice Lispector, “The Burned Sinner and the Harmonious Angels”

WW1 Memorial and Wall in Wurzburg, Germany

Würzburg, DE (Apr 21)
5D M3
This last weekend, I finally began the route in Germany called the “Romantic Road” which runs from Würzburg to Neuschwanstein for 354 kilometers. Pre-COVID travelers would take 3-4 days and stay in beautiful little Guesthouses (small hotels with food and drink). I decided to take the route in sections until I complete it because right now we are not allowed to stay overnight in any lodging.
Friday I began in Würzburg, which I have been to a few times. But I had never been to the famous Residenz there. As usual, I stumbled upon something else–a multi-layered German memorial to those who fell in WW1 and WW2. The whole experience was strange to me. Trust me, I am glad we gave the Germans then good ass-whuppuns in WW1 and especially WW2. Hitler and his goons needed to be exterminated with extreme prejudice–no argument there.
However, if you have been to Germany, there are almost no “memorials” to those wars or the “boys” who fought in those wars. The Germans have rightly erased symbols and signifiers to Nazism, fascism–Hitler.
Here, though, was a memorial still standing. I think, “think,” that it is left standing because this is a memorial to the “sons” of Würzburg and includes WW1. You can see the “signs” below. The memorial–the main sculpture–moved me emotionally. I don’t know why–maybe you can tell me. I felt embarrassed that a war “memorial,” a war memorial of our mortal enemies, moved me–but it did. This part of the large sculpture is a memorial to those Germans who fell in WW1. Their names are inscribed on the wall behind. The sculpture also strangely reminded me of the innumerable renderings of Station 13–taking Christ’s body down from the cross.
Why do we do this? As humans? Why do we inscribe murder, death, erasure, hatred, senseless killing, out into the open(ing)? Why do we make killing other human beings grand and baroque? Six soldiers, old and young, carry their fallen comrade with sorrow, symmetry, and gallantry. The fallen comrade still sidles his rifle as if all this were nobility, bravery, loyalty.
You will see that, of course, this memorial reminded me of the Vietnam war wall in Wash DC. Names, names, and more names. Boys, boys, and more boys. Women too, but we have left them out until the Vietnam memorial. I lived the Vietnam war through a lens, every night, listening to the dead count. How many Americans died today? How many VC? I remember as a young boy, feeling proud and hopeful when more VC died than American men and women. But I also remember viewing that image of Americans leaving Saigon and the Vietnamese making a human chain holding onto that helicopter out of desperation.
Some of my dear friends didn’t live that war through a lens; they lived and died the war. I know–I have no right to say anything about this part of it so I won’t except this: thank you for your service. I still disagree mightily with the Vietnam war. History will probably tell us that this was the beginning of the end of America. And then George W and Cheney sealed our fated direction. Where is the wall of names for the more than 600,000 Iraqi’s we murdered since 2003? How long would that wall be?
But the names. The boys. The women. All the “sons” of Würzburg around the world and throughout history. The names of real humans. Their faces. They were not, are not anonymous. I still don’t know what to do with this memorial. Were they, are we, victims or perpetrators? Or both?
And for what? For God’s sake, for what?
I know, this was my beginning of the “Romantic Road.” Welcome to Hudson’s world.

UAE Book Award Rejected by Habermas

UAE Book Award Rejected by Habermas
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
This is what philosophers DO in the face of injustice.
“Prominent German philosopher Juergen Habermas said he will not accept a high-priced literary award from the United Arab Emirates, reversing an earlier decision.
The 91-year-old, who is considered Germany’s preeminent contemporary philosopher, told the German news site Spiegel Online: ‘I declared my willingness to accept this year’s Sheikh Zayed Book Award. That was a wrong decision, which I correct hereby.’”
“While describing itself as an “independent” initiative, the prize is administered by the Abu Dhabi culture and tourism authorities.
Habermas’ influential writings on human rights, morality and democracy, among other topics, have stirred debate in Germany and beyond.”
Ask me how much hope he gives me…
“Freedom may never be conceived merely negatively, as the absence of compulsion. Freedom conceived intersubjectively distinguishes itself from the arbitrary freedom of the isolated individual. No one is free until we are all free.” Habermas

Via Crucis: Stuppach, Germany

Via Crucis in Stuppacher, Germany
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

Stuppach, DE (May 21)
5D M3
“St. Joseph cut the umbilical cord. And the mother was smiling. The aunt was weeping.
No one knows whether that child had to walk the Via Crucis. Everyone does.”
“Via Crucis,” Clarice Lispector

Via Crucis in Stuppacher, Germany-Stuppacher Madonna

Stuppacher Madonna
Mathias Grünewald
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

I spent my college and graduate years studying ancient languages, hermeneutics, biblical studies, theology, Syro-Palestinian archaeology, and, of course, the history of “religious” art. Some pieces in particular captured my attention and imagination, and one of them is Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheim Altarpiece. It is in Colmar, France, and one of my goals is to see this work before I leave for the summer.

But Matthias Grünewald created other masterpieces, and this one in particular I have wanted to see for 40 years. The “Stuppacher Madonna” resides in the smallest churches in one of the smallest villages in Europe. I couldn’t get close to it though–maybe 10 feet–because it is surrounded by glass. But I finally got to see this masterpiece. The “Isenheim” is majestic and full of beauty and grandeur. The “Stuppacher” is like no other Madonna and child. Though painted in 1519 (2 years after Luther’s public protest), I see this as one of those paintings/pieces waving goodbye to the Middle Ages and heralding the Renaissance and the Enlightenment.
Notice how “human” and unstylized Mary and baby are. And Jesus with golden curly hair laughing, and Mary smiling, and a sun shining where the halo “should” be? How did he paint this in such a time? How did he get away with this? This revolutionary masterpiece rests in a small church of “no” consequence. In my mind, here we have one of the first humanist Madonna and Child. Realism rejects stylized; real life refuses religious pretension; effusive joy overflows and lights the ubiquitous dark world; mother plays tenderly with her child with no hint of what is to come.
And notice the white lilies in the foreground–they force us to view them, and they take our breath away. This is mother and child as intended. This is mother and child playing together in the lush and light garden of Eden. The innocence is hopeful and heart-breaking in the same moment. We know the end of the story–Station 13 weighs heavily in our minds. But Grünewald gives us this moment in time unseen up to his day; Grünewald’s rendition reminds of the light and love and downright joy of mother and child no matter who they be. There are billions of Marys; innumerable Christ-childs.
Mostly, never in my life did I think I would get to see this in real time.
Thank you, thank you.
“The Madonna was painted by the creator of the Isenheim Altarpiece , the master painter Mathis at the court of Cardinal Albrechts zu Aschaffenburg, also known as Mathis Gothart Nithart or Matthias Grünewald .
The Maria Snow Chapel in the Aschaffenburg collegiate church is said to be the original home of the image of Mary. From 1519 it was the center piece of the three-winged altarpiece and came around 1532 as a gift from Cardinal Albrecht to the Teutonic Order of Mergentheim. It has been repeatedly restored and initially attributed to Rubens.
After the abolition of the Teutonic Order (1809), the Maria-Schnee-Tafel found a new home in the parish church of Stuppach in 1812. After a Tübingen scientist finally awarded the “Stuppacher Madonna” to Matthias Grünewald in 1908, the picture was thoroughly restored from 1926-1931. It was then placed in a specially built chapel, which was attached to the late Gothic parish church of the Coronation of Mary (1607).”
Anton Friedrich gave this brief description of the world-famous Stuppach Madonna in his “History of a Village”.

Palestinian Infant Sustains Punching-Related Injury In Violent Clash With Israeli Police

Palestinian Infant Sustains Punching-Related Injury In Violent Clash With Israeli Police

Written by Caitlin Johnstone

Palestinian Infant Sustains Punching-Related Injury In Violent Clash With Israeli Police
Written by Caitlin Johnstone

Johnstone, May 8, 2021

Palestinian Infant Sustains Punching-Related Injury In Violent Clash With Israeli Police

JERUSALEM — A four-month old Palestinian infant has sustained fist-related injuries to the face on Saturday during a violent clash with Israeli police officers.

Early reports are unclear whether the violence was instigated by the police or the baby girl. Also unknown is whether the child’s injuries were incurred by being struck or by attacking the officers’ fists with her face.

The knuckle-associated trauma occurred when violence broke out between the infant and several officers in riot gear in East Jerusalem, where clashes have been occurring due to rising anger over evictions of Palestinian families on land claimed by Jewish settlers. Both sides lay claim to the disputed properties, with the families arguing that the houses are their homes that they live in, and the settlers arguing that they were given the houses by decree in ancient scriptures authored by an invisible omnipotent deity.

Video footage of the incident went viral on social media minutes before being deleted from all platforms, leading to calls for peace from US officials.

“Very concerned about this violent clash, both sides should have de-escalated,” Vice President Kamala Harris said in a Twitter response to the video, adding, “Violence is never the answer, no matter your age.”

“We call on all babies to obey the rules-based international order,” added Secretary of State Antony Blinken.

Asked for comment on the incident during a Saturday interview with NNC’s Ray Theon, New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said that “It’s not so much about the what of these happenings, but the how. Sometimes the how gets lost in the what, and then the what gets obscured by the why, and the why gets eaten by the who, and who even am I anyway? Who is anybody? Ultimately nobody knows. It’s a philosophical mystery, just like that incident with the baby.”

“Israel has a right to defend itself from terrorists of any developmental stage,” the Israel Police told NNC when asked for comment.

Les Overton, a senior fellow at the Washington-based think tank American-Israeli Center for Strategic Genocide, says both sides have been equally affected by this latest wave of violence, with Palestinians sustaining numerous fatalities and serious injuries and Israeli law enforcement suffering emotional discomfort and great inconvenience.

“It’s just a really perplexing situation,” Overton said. “On one hand you’ve got the Palestinians suffering under what more and more human rights groups are calling an ‘apartheid regime’, but on the other hand you’ve got the Israeli government and violent far-right extremists suffering from a desire to not have Palestinians living near them anymore. It’s hard to say who’s in the wrong here.”

“While Palestinians claim they have a right to live with basic human dignity in the homes they’ve spent their entire lives in, Israelis contend that those demands are invalidated by a religious text written thousands of years ago,” Overton added. “It’s a real pickle.”

“But let’s be real here,” Overton said. “Who among us, at some point in their lives, hasn’t needed to punch a baby in self-defense?”

“Be the Note”

“Be the Note”
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

“God picks up the reed-flute world and blows,
Each note is a need coming through one of us,
a passion, a longing-pain.
Remember the lips
where the wind-breath originated,
and let your note be clear.
Don’t try to end it.
Be your note.
I’ll show you how it’s enough.”

Jelaluddin Balkhi, “Rumi”

Time Flies: Faraway So Close

Time Flies: Faraway So Close
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

“Let me explain a couple of things. Time is short. That’s the first thing. For the weasel, Time is a weasel. For the hero, Time is heroic. If you’re gentle, your Time is gentle. If you’re in a hurry, Time flies. Time is a servant, if you are its master. Time is your god, if you are its dog. We are the creators of Time, the victims of Time, and the killers of Time. Time is timeless. That’s the second thing. You are the clock, Cassiel.” Emit Flesti, Wim Wenders, Faraway So Close

 
Berlin Dom, (Sept 2020)
Kodak Ekta 100

Abby of Hildegard Bingen, Detail “Burning Bush”

Abby of Hildegard Bingen, Detail “Burning Bush”
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

“And the messenger of the Lord appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. Moses looked, and behold, the bush was burning, but it was not consumed.” Ex 3

We forget that the most important part of this passage is the strange reality that the fire did not consume the bush…

Religion, Bible, and Theology Scholars Collude with Israeli Apartheid

Religion Scholars Collude with Israeli Apartheid
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

“To me, this is one of the biggest ethical questions of our time.”

It’s time religion-biblical-theological organizations, churches, schools, seminaries, and so-called “anti-colonial” scholars in these fields reckon with the Palestinians and their outright devastation. It remains strange to me that religion-biblical-theological scholars carry the flag bravely into the fray in the name of justice–until the issue of the Palestinians. Hear those crickets? Yeah, I don’t even hear the crickets. What’s wrong–Bibi got your tongue?

It is no longer a debate, and everyone who remains in silence participates in the ethnic cleansing and genocide of an entire people and culture in 2021. Have you ever said to yourself, “My God, I wish I had been alive during the Holocaust! I would have done something?” No, you wouldn’t because you’re turning a blind eye now. Tenure? Never even been to Palestine? West Bank? Gaza? Went on some cutesy “Israel” trip orchestrated by masters of propaganda? Afraid of outright racists calling you a racist? Seriously? Afraid of being called “anti-semitic” because Israeli semites are colonizing Palestinian semites?

@SBL @AAR/SBL Southeast @AAR @ASOR

Portico Detail for the Museum MMK für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, DE (Mar 2021)

Portico Detail for the Museum MMK für Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, DE (Mar 2021)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
 
Mono Q2
 
I really love this entrance, and even though it is a B and W Mono, the portico itself is B and W Mono. How does one capture this? I chose to keep the “industrial” on the left and the “celestial” on the right. But notice that these are “stairs”–upside down stairs? Is there such a thing as upside down stairs? And could we even tread them? We need them badly, longingly, but we can only observe them–their simplicity, elegance, symmetry, their almost invisible, ignored presence. Such a view–my view of this portico for the last few years–has made me think of Jacob and his ladder, Mohammad and his fleet-footed horse and his flight into the darkness, Duchamp and his complex and multi-dimensional nude, and even Zeppelin’s decadent Stairway to Heaven. Yeah.
 
Maybe that’s one of our human problems we need to remedy but can’t. We must use our stairs within the bounds of gravity–except, except, in art, in our imaginations, in our creative eyes, in our minds, in our yearning to go beyond ourselves to right the world. Have you noticed that there are few places in this life with no bounds, places where we can soar without limits? This is Design. Art. Lascivious, ridiculous, laughable creativity. Upside down stairs? “Insanity,” some say.

“Gentlemen of the Road”

“Gentlemen of the Road”
Hauptwache, Frankfurt, DE (2021)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

Gentlemen of the Road”
 
Hauptwache, Frankfurt, DE (2021)
Mono Q2
 
“As a general rule of biology, migratory species are less ‘aggressive’ than sedentary ones.
 
There is one obvious reason why this should be so. The migration itself, like the pilgrimage, is the hard journey: a ‘leveller’ on which the ‘fit’ survive and stragglers fall by the wayside.
 
The journey thus pre-empts the need for hierarchies and shows of dominance. The ‘dictators’ of the animal kingdom are those who live in an ambience of plenty. The anarchists, as always, are the ‘gentlemen of the road’.”
― Bruce Chatwin, The Songlines

“Station 13” Frankfurt Dom

“Station 13” Frankfurt Dom
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

Station 13″
Frankfurt Dom, Frankfurt, DE (Mar 2021)
Mono Q2
 
“Oh Mary of silence
You pick my heart with a smile
Oh sweet Mary
Come inside for a while
Help me get a hold on you
Or I will
I thought of myself beside you
Take me into your skin
 
Oh, sweet Mary of silence
Oh, sweet Mary of silence
 
We have a steady confusion
You’re looking at fear
It doesn’t seem like the first time
You walked out in a hurry.”
Mazzy Star

“The Way Through the Woods”: Frankfurt Dom

“The Way Through the Woods”
Frankfurt Dom, Frankfurt, DE (Mar 2021)
Mono Q2
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

 

The Way Through the Woods”
Frankfurt Dom, Frankfurt, DE (Mar 2021)
Mono Q2
 
“They shut the road through the woods
Seventy years ago.
Weather and rain have undone it again,
And now you would never know
There was once a road through the woods
Before they planted the trees.
It is underneath the coppice and heath,
And the thin anemones …”
 
Rudyard Kipling, “The Way Through the Woods”

“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Foreigner”: God Cares for the Oppressed

This week we take on the controversial and subversive message of the ancient Hebrew prophets such as Jeremiah and Micah. Their message was disturbing and disruptive 2500 years ago, and their message continues to interrogate any and every religious or political impulse today. These ancient prophets offered an entirely different way of viewing life, religion, and God. We have to remember that they were social and political critics and not soothsayers divining the future. Think of Nathan and David here. Or Elijah and Ahab. What is true religion? What does it mean that God is holy, and Christians are called to be holy?
Unfortunately, many Western Christians think in the same ways as the ancient Judahites: religion is morality, not holiness; God is my comfort, not my disrupter. The Hebrew prophets will come along and preach a few simple messages. One is quite simple and yet almost never practiced. “The widow, the orphan, and the alien: God cares for the oppressed.” True religion is this: caring for those who cannot care for themselves–taking care of whoever “lives” in your world no matter their country, color, or creed. Morality in society is needed, but morality is not paramount. Never does the Bible say that God is “moral.” “More'”–a Latin word signifying the idea of building fences around to guard against. Morality easily slips into oppression and hatred for the other(s). It used to be moral to deny African-Americans their civil rights. Morality really stinks when it is used in arrogance and greed.
God is holy. Holiness means that Jews and Christians are set apart unto Yahweh. For what? Set apart not to defend our possessions and use others for more possessions–think Ahab and Naboth’s vineyard here–but set apart so that we can swing wide the gates of mercy and compassion. “Welcome, my friend, whoever you are.” Ignoring the poor, turning our eyes away from the desperate, looking down upon those who struggle, stealing other peoples’ lands–the list is endless. All these are travesties of injustice. God is vulnerable here in God’s holiness; we are most vulnerable here too. To be holy means to open our clinched fists and crossed arms–to open ourselves up to the suffering of others and, most importantly, their care and well-being. “God has told you, O human, what is beautiful. Now what does Yahweh “I-be-who-I-be” require of you but to do the right thing, to love kindness, and to walk in humility with your God?” (Micah 6:8 trans. mine) And check out

Michael Hudson’s prompt for this week’s question of the week. And you should have heard Sydney Bailey’s personal words as we wrapped class this last Tuesday.
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson

Syrian Refugee Son, Beirut, Lebanon (Mar 2017)

Syrian Refugee Son, Beirut, Lebanon (Mar 2017)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Syrian Refugee Son, Beirut, Lebanon (Mar 2017)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
“The most miserable of the gods and the most divine of the miserable.” H Cixous, Stigmata
 
There are some faces who never leave me. Alone. I wake at night sometimes and see their spectres, but mostly, I see myself, my county, my world, in their eyes. What have we done? What are we doing? Why didn’t I give him more money? Where did I learn to reach out to desperation with a clinched fist? Who taught me that maybe he doesn’t “deserve” a “handout?” Why didn’t I get his information? I did try. His address was the streets. Where did I learn to bring poverty to poverty?

Der Himmel über Berlin: Kodak Ekta 100 (Oct 2020)

Der Himmel über Berlin
“Tell me of the men, women, and children who will look for me – me, their storyteller, their bard, their choirmaster – because they need me more than anything in the world.”
Kodak Ekta 100 (Oct 2020)
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Der Himmel über Berlin

“Tell me of the men, women, and children who will look for me – me, their storyteller, their bard, their choirmaster – because they need me more than anything in the world.”
Kodak Ekta 100 (Oct 2020)

Theme 4: Wisdom Literature: Living the Good Life

Theme 4: Living the Good Life
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Theme 4: Wisdom Literature: Living the Good Life. Bringing poetry to chaos, complaint to injustice. Answering questions that can’t be answered but must be asked. Having our own vine and fig tree. God is not a genie who removes the chaos and tragedies of life. Bringing beauty, justice, and relationship to an ugly world. We can be whole without being cured. Embracing the pain and the wounds. Felix culpa. Bles-sed wound.

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice: God is One and Incomprehensible

This week we take on one of our most important themes essential to Christianity: God is One and Incomprehensible. This one rocks a few worlds. Yesterday in lecture we talked about Moses at the burning bush and learning the “name” of God which is not really a name. We learned that God is a verb–not a noun. Hayah. “I be who I be.” We learned that we can know God and understand certain things about God, but humans will never comprehend God. Go Latin on me here. Deus absconditus. Indeed. This begins in Judaism–it took a few centuries or 5. And this becomes foundational to Christianity also. And Michael Martin Hudson wrote another great Question of the Week prompt. And Sydney gave a great interpretation of our theme of the week and schooled these youngsters on proper formatting. This is King–we present professional papers and begin Freshman year. The older I get, the more I need smart, young translators.

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Question of the week 5_God is One and Incomprehensible: Michael Martin Hudson

Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD