Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice: God is One and Incomprehensible

This week we take on one of our most important themes essential to Christianity: God is One and Incomprehensible. This one rocks a few worlds. Yesterday in lecture we talked about Moses at the burning bush and learning the “name” of God which is not really a name. We learned that God is a verb–not a noun. Hayah. “I be who I be.” We learned that we can know God and understand certain things about God, but humans will never comprehend God. Go Latin on me here. Deus absconditus. Indeed. This begins in Judaism–it took a few centuries or 5. And this becomes foundational to Christianity also. And Michael Martin Hudson wrote another great Question of the Week prompt. And Sydney gave a great interpretation of our theme of the week and schooled these youngsters on proper formatting. This is King–we present professional papers and begin Freshman year. The older I get, the more I need smart, young translators.

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Question of the week 5_God is One and Incomprehensible: Michael Martin Hudson

Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Hebron, Palestine

Hebron, Palestine
Don Michael Hudson. PhD

Palestinian children on a rooftop near the entrance to the old city of Hebron. This was my first time in the old city of Hebron, and I was told that if one wanted to understand the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, one must visit Hebron. I’m so glad I went; I wish I had never gone. (July 2015)

Meet Our Graduates: Glory Cumbow

Meet Our Graduates: Glory Cumbow
Glory Cumbow
Glory Cumbow
“I transferred to King because I wanted smaller class sizes and to have professors who knew me personally. When I transferred I immediately felt like I belonged and that my voice mattered. I really found my voice in my theology courses while simultaneously exercising my creativity in my theatre practicum. My love for academic theology that sparked at King led me to get my Master of Divinity from Columbia Theological Seminary. I stayed another year to earn my Master of Arts in Practical Theology which allowed me to explore creativity in worship and liturgy. Now I am using my theological education and passion for creativity to write. My book of liturgy, “Breath for the Breathless: Liturgy for Life’s Difficult Seasons” was published by Wipf and Stock last month. I have also published articles with Fidelia Magazine and Unbound: An Interactive Journal of Christian Social Justice. If I had not transferred to King where my professors were invested in my education and my future, I don’t think I would have pursued seminary education and have found my voice to write. For young people who are entering adulthood, they need to feel important and validated to propel them toward their goals. King did that for me.”
Glory was a smart and multi-talented student. And she’s already written her first book. We are grateful that Glory chose to study with us at King, and we look forward to all the good and great things she will do.