Göbekli Tepe: Neolithic Gathering and Feasting at the Beginning of Food Production

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Göbekli Tepe, Copyright DAI

Göbekli Tepe: Neolithic Gathering and Feasting at the Beginning of Food Production

ASOR July 2017

“A few kilometres northeast of modern Şanlıurfa in south-eastern Turkey, the tell of Göbekli Tepe is situated on the highest point of the otherwise barren Germuş mountain range. Rising 15 metres and with an area of about 9 hectares, the completely man-made mound covers the earliest known monumental cult architecture in the ancient Near East. Constructed by hunter-gatherers right after the end of the last Ice Age, they also intentionally buried it about 10,000 years ago.”

This is an important report and update from the team working on/at Göbekli Tepe. I visited this site a little over two years ago. The site reaches back to over 11,000 years ago and challenges our view of PP Neolithic life, agriculture, and possibly religion. I do, however, disagree with a few of the authors’ interpretations. I think it is too early to be arguing GT as a site for “feasting.” Admittedly, the authors argue that their conclusions are based on “ethnologic and historic analogies,” not archaeology in situ. So we must be cautious for now. But a very nice article nonetheless.

And here are some of my photos from March 2015:

Istanbul

And here is the site for their excellent blog roll:

https://tepetelegrams.wordpress.com/

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Gobekli Tepe, Copyright DAI

The VALUE project: Video Games and Archaeology at Leiden University

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The VALUE project: Video Games and Archaeology at Leiden University

ASOR June 2017

“What do video games have to do with archaeology? The worlds of Grand Theft Auto, Super Mario Bros., or Tetris seem a far cry from anything archaeologists usually work on. But both involve imagining and visualizing worlds populated by humans, with human behavior and culture (and sometimes with mutated humans, aliens, the undead, and giant gorillas throwing barrels). VALUE (Videogames and Archaeology at Leiden University) began two and a half years ago. One of our many goals is to show the great potential video games have for archaeology in terms of public outreach, heritage preservation, and education, but also for actual research.”

Sumerian Art to Modern Art from Gudea to Miro

Sumerian Art to Modern Art from Gudea to Miro

ASOR June 2017

“Artists always turn to their predecessors for inspiration. The impact of Mesopotamia on Modern Art was as significant as it was unexpected. But it was a case of artists being inspired by “art” that had been created thousands of years earlier and for completely different purposes.

The ‘Golden Age’ of archaeological excavations in Mesopotamia came from the 1920s until the end of World War II, when Iraq and Syria gained their independence from Britain and France. During this period Sumerian and Akkadian artworks and texts became increasingly well known as information spread widely through both scientific and popular publications, academic conferences, and temporary exhibitions.”