“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Foreigner”: God Cares for the Oppressed

This week we take on the controversial and subversive message of the ancient Hebrew prophets such as Jeremiah and Micah. Their message was disturbing and disruptive 2500 years ago, and their message continues to interrogate any and every religious or political impulse today. These ancient prophets offered an entirely different way of viewing life, religion, and God. We have to remember that they were social and political critics and not soothsayers divining the future. Think of Nathan and David here. Or Elijah and Ahab. What is true religion? What does it mean that God is holy, and Christians are called to be holy?
Unfortunately, many Western Christians think in the same ways as the ancient Judahites: religion is morality, not holiness; God is my comfort, not my disrupter. The Hebrew prophets will come along and preach a few simple messages. One is quite simple and yet almost never practiced. “The widow, the orphan, and the alien: God cares for the oppressed.” True religion is this: caring for those who cannot care for themselves–taking care of whoever “lives” in your world no matter their country, color, or creed. Morality in society is needed, but morality is not paramount. Never does the Bible say that God is “moral.” “More'”–a Latin word signifying the idea of building fences around to guard against. Morality easily slips into oppression and hatred for the other(s). It used to be moral to deny African-Americans their civil rights. Morality really stinks when it is used in arrogance and greed.
God is holy. Holiness means that Jews and Christians are set apart unto Yahweh. For what? Set apart not to defend our possessions and use others for more possessions–think Ahab and Naboth’s vineyard here–but set apart so that we can swing wide the gates of mercy and compassion. “Welcome, my friend, whoever you are.” Ignoring the poor, turning our eyes away from the desperate, looking down upon those who struggle, stealing other peoples’ lands–the list is endless. All these are travesties of injustice. God is vulnerable here in God’s holiness; we are most vulnerable here too. To be holy means to open our clinched fists and crossed arms–to open ourselves up to the suffering of others and, most importantly, their care and well-being. “God has told you, O human, what is beautiful. Now what does Yahweh “I-be-who-I-be” require of you but to do the right thing, to love kindness, and to walk in humility with your God?” (Micah 6:8 trans. mine) And check out

Michael Hudson’s prompt for this week’s question of the week. And you should have heard Sydney Bailey’s personal words as we wrapped class this last Tuesday.
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson
“The Widow, the Orphan, and the Alien”: God Cares for the Oppressed
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Michael Martin Hudson

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice: God is One and Incomprehensible

This week we take on one of our most important themes essential to Christianity: God is One and Incomprehensible. This one rocks a few worlds. Yesterday in lecture we talked about Moses at the burning bush and learning the “name” of God which is not really a name. We learned that God is a verb–not a noun. Hayah. “I be who I be.” We learned that we can know God and understand certain things about God, but humans will never comprehend God. Go Latin on me here. Deus absconditus. Indeed. This begins in Judaism–it took a few centuries or 5. And this becomes foundational to Christianity also. And Michael Martin Hudson wrote another great Question of the Week prompt. And Sydney gave a great interpretation of our theme of the week and schooled these youngsters on proper formatting. This is King–we present professional papers and begin Freshman year. The older I get, the more I need smart, young translators.

Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice Feb 16 2021
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Question of the week 5_God is One and Incomprehensible: Michael Martin Hudson

Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Question of the Week #5
Michael Martin Hudson
Don Michael Hudson, PhD

Meet Our B and R Faculty: Dr. Amber Warhurst

Meet Our B and R Faculty: Dr. Amber Warhurst
Don Michael Hudson, PhD
Meet Our B and R Faculty:
Dr. Amber Warhurst
“Hello! My name is Amber Warhurst and I am an online instructor for King University’s Bible and Religion Department. My job is amazing because I get to teach a subject I’m passionate about, while getting to know people online from all over the country who I would never get to meet otherwise. Although I’ve taught Foundations of Christian Thought and Practice dozens of times over the past seven years, I’m constantly surprised and delighted by the insights students have about the themes. The class combines Christian ideas, individual experiences, and current events, making for a unique experience every semester. My interest in biblical studies began when I was an undergraduate student, so I appreciate how formative the college years are in a person’s life. After college, I went on to get a M.A. in Biblical Languages from Regent College, Vancouver and a PhD in Hebrew Bible from University of St. Andrews, Scotland. I especially love reading the Bible in its original languages and exploring its literary artistry. In addition to Foundations, I also teach online Old Testament and Interpretation and Hebrew Wisdom Literature for King. When I’m not grading online assignments, I’m homeschooling my four children, skiing or hiking in the beautiful Wasatch mountains of Salt Lake City, wading through the endless stack of books on my nightstand, or working on house renovations to distract me from the piles of laundry and dishes. “
What can I say about Dr. Warhurst? Way too much. Our department would be terribly deficient without her. She’s been with us over a decade. She’s brilliant, the consummate professor, meticulous, and cares for her students. She also answers her emails on time every time (that says a lot about someone, doesn’t it? Our department policy is to answer all student emails within 24 hours–she does, of course–I digress). Thank you, Amber for being with us. We are grateful for your scholarship and your excellence.